Tag Archives: Braila Island

Adventures in the stoichiometry of Braila Island, Research Center in Systems Ecology and Sustainability

Author: Shabnam G.Farahani

Braila eLTER

My scientific trip to Romania started on September 2nd, 2017. On the following day, I visited the Faculty of Biology, of the University of Bucharest where I met  the intimate staff of Biogeochemical Circuits laboratory.

On Monday morning after meeting the team from the Research Center in Systems Ecology and Sustainability, we headed to the Braila Research Station. The Research Centre in Systems Ecology and Sustainability (RCSES) of the University of Bucharest was established in 1999. RCSES coordinates the national Long Term Ecological Research Network and contributes to large scale and long-term research in Europe (e.g. LTER Europe, ILTER, LifeWatch Europe).

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During the three days of my stay in Braila, I was accompanied by a friendly and well organized team who assisted with the sampling and field experiments for my research.

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Braila city is located in the flat plain of Baragan.  On the east side there is the Danube, which forms an island – The Great Braila Island surrounded by the Macin channel, Cremenea channel and Valciu channel. On the northern side there is the Siret river and on the north-western side there is the Buzau River.

Braila took  me back in time as a lively and amazing city. I was genuinely impressed by the city’s past and how it became a cosmopolitan economical center of the previous century, it is really worth seeing for those who want to admire the sights of the Danube and Braila Island. In my PhD thesis at National Academy of Science of Belarus, I am examining the elemental composition of zooplankton and seston communities as it varies seasonally in the littoral and pelagic zones of temperate lakes. As such during my field trip in Braila Island, I focused on spatial differences in seston community as a limiting factor for food quality of freshwater consumers and their C:N ratios in 7 different stations along the Danube river.

After finishing the field trip, we visited the Pontoon of the Small Braila Island Natural Park administration and got acquainted with its staff.

On September 7th, we made a farewell to the beautiful city of Braila and departed for Bucharest in order to carry on the elemental analysis, at the University.

“ KUFTEH “in a foil

Kufteh is a Persian, also middle eastern yummy food which is a kind of herb meat ball in tomato plum sauce which was so similar to what I did in sample preparation for CN machine at Bucharest University . I divided each filter into four pieces, roll them as a ball and packed them in foil, then weighed them by micro scale to place them in machine.

To tell the truth, this trip was a unique opportunity for me not only for learning new things in stoichiometry at the LTSER  site, but also for having so much fun, going with the boat on the Danube, sightseeing in Braila City, cooking steak for the team by my own recipe and 3 nights living in pontoon on beautiful Danube river.

This project would have been really impossible without the support of all my colleagues from the Faculty of Biology.

I am using this opportunity to express them my gratitude for providing the facilities of such exciting exploratory trip.


About the Author:

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Shabnam is a PhD student at Belarus National Academy of Science

The Small Island of Braila

By Jen Holzer, Technion Socio-Ecological Research Group

After three days in and around Tulcea, we journeyed by car to the City of Braila, a city of about 200,000, famous as a node for the textile, shipbuilding, and shipping trades, and a surprisingly underdeveloped tourism industry. When our hosts told us this was not a travel destination, we were incredulous and inquired with the hotel reception. But the hotel proprietor confirmed that most hotel patrons are businessmen, mostly people from the Netherlands and England involved in the textile and shipping trades; they advised us to vacation in Brașov, the mountainous, “most beautiful part of Romania”7

After a tour of the University of Bucharest’s beautifully refurbished laboratory facilities in the city, we toured the Faculty’s pontoon on the Danube, complete with laboratories and sleeping quarters, and sat with local environmental managers and scientists for interviews and discussions.8

The next day, we drove to Stăncuţa to meet with the mayor of this communa, a collection of local villages bordering the protected Small Island of Braila, a LTSER platform. Interviewing the mayor and his colleagues at the Town Hall was illuminating for understanding the interplay of stakeholder interests – from EU funding requirements and opportunities to the situation of the veterinary technician who moved back to the hometown of his grandparents but was struggling to make ends meet, to wide local opposition to limits on grazing in the protected area on the Small Island of Braila.9

We were generously hosted for a fantastic lunch by the Mayor at a new research facility on the shores of the Danube, and set out on a short boat tour of Braila Island.

Coming from Israel, I am no stranger to a dynamic and fraught history of political conflict and transition, nor to a reality of contested natural resources. While the purpose of our trip was to understand the progress and barriers made by socio-ecological research in Romania, I was hardly expecting the depth of cultural exchange that took place on every level. I want to express my gratitude to our hosts, not only for their thoughtful hospitality down to the last detail, but also for their incredible patience in answering our questions – from the role of macrophytes in the Danube Delta ecosystem to the residual effects of the Communist period on environmental management to the role of ecologists as educators. As social ecologists, the social context of science is always relevant, on every level, including the personal.

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Jen is a PhD student in the Technion Socio-Ecological Research Group in Haifa, Israel and is affiliated with the Israeli LTSER network, with whom she is currently writing an article about applying transdisciplinary action research at the Negev Desert platform. Her research evaluates impacts of the transition in ecological research toward transdisciplinary socio-ecological research in Europe. Her trip to Romania was funded by an eLTER Transnational Access research exchange grant. She is happy to receive your comments, feedback, and suggestions for trivia questions about Romania at jholzer@technion.ac.il.

There’s Nothing Trivial about the Danube Delta

 

By: Jen Holzer, Technion Socio-Ecological Research Group

Romania Trivia

  1. Which nations border Romania?
  2. The Danube River empties into which sea?
  3. In what year did Romania become part of the European Union?
  4. Name a Romania-born Nobel Laureate.
  5. This Romanian building is known as the largest building in Europe.

Answers:

  1. Bulgaria, Servia, Hungary, Ukraine, Moldova
  2. Black Sea
  3. 2007
  4. George Emil Palade (Physiology and Medicine, 1974), Elie Weisel (Peace, 1986), Herta Muller (Literature, 2009), Stefan Walter Hell (Chemistry, 2014)
  5. Palace of the Parliament building in Bucharest

Tulcea, Gateway to the Danube Delta

On our first morning in Bucharest, Romania’s capital, Dr. Mihai Adamescu met us (my advisor, Dr. Daniel Orenstein, and myself), and together we walked 10 minutes north, past the Palace of the Parliament, said to be the largest building in Europe and the third-largest in the world, to the Faculty of Biology of Bucharest University, which has programs in biology, biochemistry, and ecology.

After a tour, we drank tea up a steep, narrow staircase in the Systems Ecology faculty – the office of our esteemed hosts, Mihai and his colleague Constantin – and without further ado, we departed on a 4-hour drive to the resort town of Tulcea, gateway to the Danube Delta.

We drove through vast flatland monocultures – sunflowers, corn, and wheat – and then on to solar fields boasting the latest model of German-made wind turbines. Romania currently gets 25% of its energy mix from renewables. The electric wires slumped what looked to be dangerously low across the fields. Finally, after two pit stops, we crossed a bridge straddling the murky Danube, of mythic proportions and Hulk-green.

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On our first day in Tulcea, we boarded a medium-sized motorboat fit for 8 people, and our boatman, Jeru, drove out into the Danube Delta. We took the river downstream, then several canals, two large lakes, and back home, for a full 8-hour tour, including a 2-hour stop in Criştan, the home village of our boatman, for a traditional lunch of fish stew, called chorba.

Our host ecologists took us to the a reflooding project, where the marshland had been drained for agriculture, and then, in a long-fought-for change of policy, was reflooded, about a year ago, to restore the wetlands. A team of horses and a herd of cows roamed the area, marked by man-made dikes, and dotted with native flowers.

They also pointed out the abundance of endemic biodiversity, despite it “not being birding season”. So many birds I had never seen before! Little egret, great egret, the invasive shore plant amorpha fructosa. Great white heron, little tern, black tern, common tern. Juvenile and adult cormorants. Black ibis, geese, swans. A lonely white pelican. A rare Dalmatian pelican. A domesticated pig, a wild boar. An otter. When we stepped onshore, tiny frogs sprang out of the mud in abundance.

We inaugurated our interviews that day with the impromptu questioning of our boat captain, native to the small village of Criştan, accessible only by boat. He shared a dominant view of many locals, who saw the Biosphere Reserve designation as a barrier to poor fishermen like himself, who needed as much catch as they could get. While we were there, our phones picked up the Ukrainian phone network, reminding us of the transboundary nature of the Danube Delta.

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The following day we interviewed the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve Authority Governor Dr. Baboianu, researchers at the Danube Delta Research Institute, and an administrator of the Biosphere Reserve Authority who discussed her daily struggles with enforcing Biosphere regulations.

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Our interviews in Tulcea were done. The next morning we would set out toward the City of Braila, adjacent to the Small Island of Braila, a 15,000 hectare nature reserve dedicated to protecting the natural floodplains and wetland habitat characteristic of the Lower Danube area, another important bird migration corridor between Europe and Africa.

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Jen is a PhD student in the Technion Socio-Ecological Research Group in Haifa, Israel and is affiliated with the Israeli LTSER network, with whom she is currently writing an article about applying transdisciplinary action research at the Negev Desert platform. Her research evaluates impacts of the transition in ecological research toward transdisciplinary socio-ecological research in Europe. Her trip to Romania was funded by an eLTER Transnational Access research exchange grant. She is happy to receive your comments, feedback, and suggestions for trivia questions about Romania at jholzer@technion.ac.il.