Fruška gora LTER site from the perspective of hoverflies, treeclimbers and satellites

By Dušanka Krašić If it wasn't for this geological bump (the highest peak 549m), the northern part of Serbia would remain devoid of many ecosystem services, much of its biodiversity, life forms, oxygen, historical values and research opportunities. In simple terms, it would be quite boring area. Fruška gora is the first Serbian National park, founded... Continue Reading →

(Don’t) judge an aquifer by its covering

By Laura Busato, Siptenfelde and TERENO observatory Harz/Central German Lowland My second time in Germany starts on a hot and sunny summer day. After a short meeting with researchers and technicians from the Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research in Leipzig, and some instrumentation checking, me and the other group member are ready to reach the TERENO field... Continue Reading →

The Small Island of Braila

By Jen Holzer, Technion Socio-Ecological Research Group After three days in and around Tulcea, we journeyed by car to the City of Braila, a city of about 200,000, famous as a node for the textile, shipbuilding, and shipping trades, and a surprisingly underdeveloped tourism industry. When our hosts told us this was not a travel... Continue Reading →

There’s Nothing Trivial about the Danube Delta

  By: Jen Holzer, Technion Socio-Ecological Research Group Romania Trivia Which nations border Romania? The Danube River empties into which sea? In what year did Romania become part of the European Union? Name a Romania-born Nobel Laureate. This Romanian building is known as the largest building in Europe. Answers: Bulgaria, Servia, Hungary, Ukraine, Moldova Black Sea... Continue Reading →

Life in the Clean Van

By Maitreyi Nagarkar, CCE LTER This past April I went on the CCE LTER El Nino Rapid Response cruise, and it was my first ever time on a research cruise. My own research focuses on samples that I collect right off the Scripps Pier in La Jolla, California, so this was a new and exciting... Continue Reading →

A little water goes a long way

By Nate Emery, SBC LTER How do you catch a cloud and pull it down? It’s not easy, but that’s what I have been doing for several years: investigating how fog affects shrub species along the southern California coast. Figuring out how plants use fog water is a two-fold process that involves stable isotopes and... Continue Reading →

The Rigors and Rewards of Fieldwork

As our boat cut through the chop of the Santa Barbara Channel, sending fans of spray hissing in our wake, I couldn’t help but appreciate the beautiful day and consider how fortunate I was that my job requires regular SCUBA diving. While relishing this blissful feeling and the glorious weather, I noticed that my fin... Continue Reading →

Look at the Filters on that Rack!

I am a biological oceanographer and I study plankton - microscopic floating plants and animals. That means to do my research, I filter seawater - liters and liters of it. Why? Well, in order to study the small plankton in the ocean, you can’t use a net; they’ll slip right through even the smallest net.... Continue Reading →

Follow along with the El Nino Research Cruise!

The CCE LTER researchers are heading out on Tuesday for a 3 week long research cruise focused on investigating the effects of El Nino on our study site: the California Current. We are excited to get some sea time and check out what this recent atmospheric phenomenon means for the biology, chemistry, and physics of this productive region.... Continue Reading →

Salad Cages

By Christie Yorke of the SBC LTER My graduate student research often involves combining mesh, zip-ties, PVC piping, and massive amounts of electrical tape to create experimental set-ups. I've zip-tied plastic bags around kelp to measure the stuff that sloughs off and put animals in homemade cages with kelp to measure how much they can... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑