Category Archives: Uncategorized

Southwest Regional Student Meetup – Grasslands, Deserts, and Cities

by Megan Wheeler, Brian Kim, and Alesia Hallmark


Last October at the LTER All Scientists’ Meeting in Monterey, California the graduate student committee identified between-site relationships as a key component of our mission statement. Building on the momentum from the October meeting, graduate students from the Sevilleta and Jornada Basin LTERs joined the CAP LTER in Scottsdale, Arizona for a regional meetup in conjunction with CAP’s annual All Scientists’ Meeting (ASM).

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CAP and Sevilleta students at South Mountain Preserve, with the city of Phoenix in the background.

The ASM started out with a captivating presentation by Marc Johnson from University of Toronto discussing urban evolution and the story of a ubiquitous weed, white clover. This unassuming plant is capable of cyanogenesis, the production of hydrogen cyanide, in response to herbivory. Work in Johnson’s lab has shown that the genetically-coded ability to perform cyanogenesis varies along an urban to rural gradient, and he unfolded the story of how temperature, region, and snow removal are related to the presence of responsible genes.

The plenary talk was followed by short presentations of different themes within CAP research, ranging from Governance & Institutions with a strong social focus to Water & Fluxes with a biogeochemical lens. Students, faculty, and staff then shared their research in two poster sessions, which started out with each presenter giving a brief 1 minute overview of their poster to the room. For the many first-time poster presenters, this was probably the most nerve-wracking moment of the day! During the poster session, some overlapping research interests between the two sites became apparent. Several Sevilleta students presented work on arid grass- and shrubland pollinators, while CAP students presented about the roles and perceptions of pollinators in the urban environment.

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SESE graduate student Marisol Juarez Rivera describes her poster, “Is oxygen supersaturation in Tempe Town Lake mainly driven by abiotic processes?”

Visiting students said the urban focus of the meeting was totally different that the ecology they were used to seeing presented. One student suggested that it made her think about how work at the Sevilleta could be expanded out to urban sites in Albuquerque, where most Sevilleta LTER students live.

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Students present posters at the CAP ASM. Presenters: top left – Tim Ohlert, top right – Aaron Grade, bottom left – Nich Weller, bottom right – Kate Weiss.
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Poster presentations.

The next day, CAP students led a tour to one of CAP’s long term experimental sites at an urban desert preserve. After hiking around and taking lots of photos, Sevilleta students found the vegetation of our Sonoran Desert sites wasn’t totally different from what was found on the Sevilleta grassland. Several genera and some species could be found in both sites. Despite the urban focus of CAP, the ecological context of Phoenix and the Sevilleta were not all that different.

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CAP and Sevilleta students explore Sonoran Desert vegetation while hiking at South Mountain Preserve, a CAP long-term research site.
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Wildflowers in bloom at South Mountain Preserve.

We enjoyed this opportunity to engage with other students across sites and learn a little more about where our research intersects and where there might be possibilities for collaboration. In the future, the Graduate Student Committee plans to support similar events at different groups of sites with the goal of continuing to build and strengthen graduate student connections within the LTER network.

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The Small Island of Braila

By Jen Holzer, Technion Socio-Ecological Research Group

After three days in and around Tulcea, we journeyed by car to the City of Braila, a city of about 200,000, famous as a node for the textile, shipbuilding, and shipping trades, and a surprisingly underdeveloped tourism industry. When our hosts told us this was not a travel destination, we were incredulous and inquired with the hotel reception. But the hotel proprietor confirmed that most hotel patrons are businessmen, mostly people from the Netherlands and England involved in the textile and shipping trades; they advised us to vacation in Brașov, the mountainous, “most beautiful part of Romania”7

After a tour of the University of Bucharest’s beautifully refurbished laboratory facilities in the city, we toured the Faculty’s pontoon on the Danube, complete with laboratories and sleeping quarters, and sat with local environmental managers and scientists for interviews and discussions.8

The next day, we drove to Stăncuţa to meet with the mayor of this communa, a collection of local villages bordering the protected Small Island of Braila, a LTSER platform. Interviewing the mayor and his colleagues at the Town Hall was illuminating for understanding the interplay of stakeholder interests – from EU funding requirements and opportunities to the situation of the veterinary technician who moved back to the hometown of his grandparents but was struggling to make ends meet, to wide local opposition to limits on grazing in the protected area on the Small Island of Braila.9

We were generously hosted for a fantastic lunch by the Mayor at a new research facility on the shores of the Danube, and set out on a short boat tour of Braila Island.

Coming from Israel, I am no stranger to a dynamic and fraught history of political conflict and transition, nor to a reality of contested natural resources. While the purpose of our trip was to understand the progress and barriers made by socio-ecological research in Romania, I was hardly expecting the depth of cultural exchange that took place on every level. I want to express my gratitude to our hosts, not only for their thoughtful hospitality down to the last detail, but also for their incredible patience in answering our questions – from the role of macrophytes in the Danube Delta ecosystem to the residual effects of the Communist period on environmental management to the role of ecologists as educators. As social ecologists, the social context of science is always relevant, on every level, including the personal.

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Jen is a PhD student in the Technion Socio-Ecological Research Group in Haifa, Israel and is affiliated with the Israeli LTSER network, with whom she is currently writing an article about applying transdisciplinary action research at the Negev Desert platform. Her research evaluates impacts of the transition in ecological research toward transdisciplinary socio-ecological research in Europe. Her trip to Romania was funded by an eLTER Transnational Access research exchange grant. She is happy to receive your comments, feedback, and suggestions for trivia questions about Romania at jholzer@technion.ac.il.